A Little About Andy Warhol’s Films

“His genius was in his way of looking at things, at singling out common objects for extraordinary examination. But the idea of looking at a Campbell’s soup can as a work of art is what’s interesting: the idea, not the can.”

This excerpt is from Roger Ebert’s review of Andy Warhol’s 1968 film Flesh. Ebert is referring to the film but he is also describing the entire conceptual art movement. Starting back with Duchamp’s Fountain certain artists turned away from the objects they produced and focused instead on the idea and the process. Throughout the Twentieth Century, there have been conceptual iconoclasts that do more to challenge art than contribute to its so-called “progress”. Artists like John Baldessari, Joseph Kosuth, Piero Manzoni all focused on the functioning and negotiation of art and let the product of that process simply be a marker or a byproduct of the process.

I have an MFA in painting and I’m an art professor but I managed to convince my school to let me teach film. My website http://www.filmofileshideout.com/

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

Identifying common motion picture film gauges-part 2

Student Academy Award Winners Recap— 2019

Fuck Fish

Army of the Dud — A Late Review

“Love Is All You Need” — A Queer Film Review

“Love Is All You Need?” film poster with NA rating banner

Five must-see hybrids documentaries

Movie Review: “Barb and Star Go To Vista del Mar”

Why I Love Makoto Niijima over the rest of the Original Phantom Thieves

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Filmofile

Filmofile

I have an MFA in painting and I’m an art professor but I managed to convince my school to let me teach film. My website http://www.filmofileshideout.com/

More from Medium

Miguel Llansó’s Jesus Shows You The Way To The Highway

The Stone Roses could have been the 90s’ biggest act

Here’s Why You Can’t Say That About Caravaggio

Questioning Masculinity: A Re-Reading of Stan Rogers’s “Harris and the Mare”